syusyu 
syusyu 
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ancientpeoples:

Pendant
200 BC - AD 1300
Calima (Yotoco)
(Source: The British Museum)
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ancientpeoples:

Alabaster perfume vase 
Made from alabaster and inlaid with gold, glass, carnelian and obsidian. The figure is an Amarna princess, one of the daughters of Akhenaten. 
Egyptian, New Kingdom, 18th dynasty, Amarna Period, 1353-1336 BC. 
Source: Metropolitan Museum 
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ancientpeoples:

Jade pendant of a dragon 
7,9cm high (3 1/8 inch)
Chinese, Eastern Zhou Dynasty, 475 - 221 BC.
Source: Metropolitan Museum 
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ancientpeoples:

Ivory foot 
This ivory foot comes from a large statue of emperor Augustus (probably). On top of the foot is the figure of Hapy, Egyptian God of the Nile and this statue was probably from Egypt, or at least made there. 
Roman, Early Imperial Period, Augustan, 31 BC - 14 AD. 
Source: Metropolitan Museum
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ancientpeoples:

Celtic Limestone Head of a Man wearing a cap or helmet
c.2nd/3rd Century BC
British 
Height: 24.1 cm
Several similar heads have been found in Yorkshire.
Source: The Metropolitan Museum
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findlight:

Richard Long, South Bank Circle, 1991.
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berndwuersching:

Georg BaselitzMännlicher Torso, 1993
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88pp:

Mark Tobey
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88pp:

Georg Baselitz
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todayisperfect:

Georg Baselits as a sculptor
In 2010-2011 The Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris organised an exhibition of the sculptures of Georg Baselitz. This retrospective interpretation of one facet of the German artist – initially a painter and engraver – will include almost his entire sculptural output, covering a period of more than thirty years. Few of these works have been shown in France. 
Forty painted wood pieces dating from 1979 to 2010 illustrate the itinerary of an artist who has made a powerful contribution to the language of contemporary sculpture.
Given the scale of his sculptures in wood, Baselitz’s tools were the chainsaw and the axe, an approach that allowed the expression of a radicalism different from that of his canvases. Whereas the inverting of the figure in his painting gave him “the freedom to really confront painterly problems”, Baselitz saw sculpture as “the shortest path” to dealing with fundamental issues.
todayisperfect:

Georg Baselits as a sculptor
In 2010-2011 The Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris organised an exhibition of the sculptures of Georg Baselitz. This retrospective interpretation of one facet of the German artist – initially a painter and engraver – will include almost his entire sculptural output, covering a period of more than thirty years. Few of these works have been shown in France. 
Forty painted wood pieces dating from 1979 to 2010 illustrate the itinerary of an artist who has made a powerful contribution to the language of contemporary sculpture.
Given the scale of his sculptures in wood, Baselitz’s tools were the chainsaw and the axe, an approach that allowed the expression of a radicalism different from that of his canvases. Whereas the inverting of the figure in his painting gave him “the freedom to really confront painterly problems”, Baselitz saw sculpture as “the shortest path” to dealing with fundamental issues.
todayisperfect:

Georg Baselits as a sculptor
In 2010-2011 The Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris organised an exhibition of the sculptures of Georg Baselitz. This retrospective interpretation of one facet of the German artist – initially a painter and engraver – will include almost his entire sculptural output, covering a period of more than thirty years. Few of these works have been shown in France. 
Forty painted wood pieces dating from 1979 to 2010 illustrate the itinerary of an artist who has made a powerful contribution to the language of contemporary sculpture.
Given the scale of his sculptures in wood, Baselitz’s tools were the chainsaw and the axe, an approach that allowed the expression of a radicalism different from that of his canvases. Whereas the inverting of the figure in his painting gave him “the freedom to really confront painterly problems”, Baselitz saw sculpture as “the shortest path” to dealing with fundamental issues.
todayisperfect:

Georg Baselits as a sculptor
In 2010-2011 The Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris organised an exhibition of the sculptures of Georg Baselitz. This retrospective interpretation of one facet of the German artist – initially a painter and engraver – will include almost his entire sculptural output, covering a period of more than thirty years. Few of these works have been shown in France. 
Forty painted wood pieces dating from 1979 to 2010 illustrate the itinerary of an artist who has made a powerful contribution to the language of contemporary sculpture.
Given the scale of his sculptures in wood, Baselitz’s tools were the chainsaw and the axe, an approach that allowed the expression of a radicalism different from that of his canvases. Whereas the inverting of the figure in his painting gave him “the freedom to really confront painterly problems”, Baselitz saw sculpture as “the shortest path” to dealing with fundamental issues.
todayisperfect:

Georg Baselits as a sculptor
In 2010-2011 The Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris organised an exhibition of the sculptures of Georg Baselitz. This retrospective interpretation of one facet of the German artist – initially a painter and engraver – will include almost his entire sculptural output, covering a period of more than thirty years. Few of these works have been shown in France. 
Forty painted wood pieces dating from 1979 to 2010 illustrate the itinerary of an artist who has made a powerful contribution to the language of contemporary sculpture.
Given the scale of his sculptures in wood, Baselitz’s tools were the chainsaw and the axe, an approach that allowed the expression of a radicalism different from that of his canvases. Whereas the inverting of the figure in his painting gave him “the freedom to really confront painterly problems”, Baselitz saw sculpture as “the shortest path” to dealing with fundamental issues.
todayisperfect:

Georg Baselits as a sculptor
In 2010-2011 The Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris organised an exhibition of the sculptures of Georg Baselitz. This retrospective interpretation of one facet of the German artist – initially a painter and engraver – will include almost his entire sculptural output, covering a period of more than thirty years. Few of these works have been shown in France. 
Forty painted wood pieces dating from 1979 to 2010 illustrate the itinerary of an artist who has made a powerful contribution to the language of contemporary sculpture.
Given the scale of his sculptures in wood, Baselitz’s tools were the chainsaw and the axe, an approach that allowed the expression of a radicalism different from that of his canvases. Whereas the inverting of the figure in his painting gave him “the freedom to really confront painterly problems”, Baselitz saw sculpture as “the shortest path” to dealing with fundamental issues.
todayisperfect:

Georg Baselits as a sculptor
In 2010-2011 The Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris organised an exhibition of the sculptures of Georg Baselitz. This retrospective interpretation of one facet of the German artist – initially a painter and engraver – will include almost his entire sculptural output, covering a period of more than thirty years. Few of these works have been shown in France. 
Forty painted wood pieces dating from 1979 to 2010 illustrate the itinerary of an artist who has made a powerful contribution to the language of contemporary sculpture.
Given the scale of his sculptures in wood, Baselitz’s tools were the chainsaw and the axe, an approach that allowed the expression of a radicalism different from that of his canvases. Whereas the inverting of the figure in his painting gave him “the freedom to really confront painterly problems”, Baselitz saw sculpture as “the shortest path” to dealing with fundamental issues.
todayisperfect:

Georg Baselits as a sculptor
In 2010-2011 The Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris organised an exhibition of the sculptures of Georg Baselitz. This retrospective interpretation of one facet of the German artist – initially a painter and engraver – will include almost his entire sculptural output, covering a period of more than thirty years. Few of these works have been shown in France. 
Forty painted wood pieces dating from 1979 to 2010 illustrate the itinerary of an artist who has made a powerful contribution to the language of contemporary sculpture.
Given the scale of his sculptures in wood, Baselitz’s tools were the chainsaw and the axe, an approach that allowed the expression of a radicalism different from that of his canvases. Whereas the inverting of the figure in his painting gave him “the freedom to really confront painterly problems”, Baselitz saw sculpture as “the shortest path” to dealing with fundamental issues.